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Why a Court Rostered Mediator?

Court rostered mediators are trained in conflict resolution. In addition to her law degree, Christina is a licensed Utah attorney and attended the University of Utah Conflict Resolution course and the University of Utah Domestic Mediation course. Court rostered mediators have extensive training and are required to maintain their skills with 6 hours of continuing mediation training each year. Court rostered mediators are also required to serve the community with 3 pro bono (no charge) cases each year. In order to become court rostered, they have to pass a test on the Utah Ethics Code and be approved by the Utah Courts Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) Director.

The Utah Court Alternative Dispute Resolution division has established rigorous training standards to become a court rostered for Domestic cases.  Conflict resolution is a group of skills learned and practiced.  Christina is a Master Mediator, having mediated hundreds of cases and thousands of hours is approved as a Domestic Mentor.  A Domestic Mentor is the highest designation of mediators and is an abbreviated list of Master Mediators who have met the requirements to train and mentor mediators seeking court rostered status.

A court-rostered mediator is required to complete continuing education requirements and serve the community with pro bono hours.  Christina stays current on relevant law and best practices through hours of legal and mediation continuing education trainings annually.  By working with a “court-rostered mediator” you can be confident you are working with a highly trained professional guided by rigorous ethical and legal best practices. As an active member of the Utah Chapter of the Association of Family and Conciliation Courts, Christina is committed to the integrity of the mediation process and providing a cost-effective alternative to families in conflict.

Often times, people are meditating because they are struggling with a big life change. Working with a trained professional can be the difference between a favorable outcome and a shift towards investments in a positive change. In an already difficult and stressful time, why not work with someone trained and recognized by the courts as a professional in conflict resolution?